Trudeau to enforce social media platforms to remove hate speech within 24 hours or face severe penalties

Trudeau to enforce social media platforms to remove hate speech within 24 hours or face severe penalties

Here is an excerpt from the mandate letter sent by Canada’s prime minister Justin Trudeau to Steven Guilbeault, Minister of Canadian Heritage:

I will expect you to work with your colleagues and through established legislative, regulatory and Cabinet processes to deliver on your top priorities. In particular, you will:.. Create new regulations for social media platforms, starting with a requirement that all platforms remove illegal content, including hate speech, within 24 hours or face significant penalties. This should include other online harms such as radicalization, incitement to violence, exploitation of children, or creation or distribution of terrorist propaganda.

Official report: “Canada admitted 313,580 immigrants in 2018/2019”

Official report: “Canada admitted 313,580 immigrants in 2018/2019”

On September 30, 2019 Statistics Canada published its annual report on demography “Canada’s population estimates: Age and sex, July 1, 2019.”

Here are the highlights of the report:

  • Canada’s population was estimated at 37,589,262 on July 1, 2019, up 531,497 compared with July 1, 2018.
  • Canada posts the largest annual population increase in numbers.
  • Canada’s population growth rate is the highest among G7 countries.
  • Canada’s sustained population growth is driven mostly (82.2%) by the arrival of a large number of immigrants and non-permanent residents.
  • Canada admitted 313,580 immigrants in 2018/2019, one of the highest levels in Canadian history.
  • In 2015/2016, Canada received 323,192 permanent immigrants, including nearly 30,000 Syrian refugees.
  • The number of non-permanent residents rose by 171,536 in 2018/2019, the largest increase in the country’s history. While also fuelled by rapid growth in asylum claimants, this gain was mainly led by an increase in the number of work and study permit holders.
  • In 2018/2019, Quebec (+1.2%) saw its largest population increase in 30 years, while Ontario (+1.7%) recorded one of the highest growth rates for the same period.
  • Alberta’s population growth (+1.6%) accelerated for a second consecutive year, owing in part to interprovincial migration exchanges, which were positive after three consecutive years of losses.
  • On July 1, 2019, the Canadian population included 6,592,611 seniors. Of this number, which is increasing quickly, more than one in two people (51.1%) were born during the baby boom (1946 to 1965).
  • On July 1, 2019, Canada had 10,795 centenarians, topping 10,000 for the first time.
  • The Prairie provinces and the territories have the youngest populations.
Islamic schools refuse comment on allegation regarding not commemorating Remembrance Day

Islamic schools refuse comment on allegation regarding not commemorating Remembrance Day

I’ve sent a media inquiry to Islamic schools in Ontario and Alberta asking to respond to an statement made by a senior Muslim imam and scholar from London, Ontario that reads: “Islamic schools won’t have it [Remembrance Day] as a holiday because we don’t celebrate it.” As of November 23, 2019 none of the Islamic schools responded to the media inquiry.

BACKGROUND INFORMATION

Mazin AbdulAdhim, a prominent Muslim scholar and Imam from London, Ont. has stated that “Islamic schools won’t have it [Remembrance Day] as a holiday because we don’t celebrate it.”

He further explained that “it is a day to remember those who died while fighting and killing Muslims… it’s because it is a day to remember those who died while fighting and killing Muslims… The Ottomans were Muslims, and Remembrance Day first started after Britain and France and the others defeated us, killed millions of our people, and then made this celebration starting on the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month, November 11th, to forever remember *their* soldiers who fought to defeat us in that war and then invade our lands. That is why we don’t celebrate Remembrance Day, because we would be remembering their soldiers who killed millions of Muslims.”

Mazin AbdulAdhim’s Facebook post on November 11, 2019:

Today is Remembrance Day, and here is an interesting conversation I had with my daughters about why we don't celebrate…

Posted by Mazin AbdulAdhim on Monday, November 11, 2019

Inquiry: Does your school observe/celebrate Remembrance Day? YES or NO

Kindly respond by Monday 18th of November. If you need more time let me know.

Sincerely,

Eric Stanley Brazau,

Investigative journalist

ericbrazau.com

The media inquiry was sent by email to:

Ontario

1. School of Islamic Legacy, 72 Joy Mayor Driver, Mississauga

2. Al-Manariat Heights Islamic School, 2250 Argentina Road, Mississauga.

3. Islamic Foundation, Durham. Principal is Biquar.

4. Understanding Islam Academy Canada, 2570 Haines Road, Mississauga.

5. School of Islamic Study Ontario. Chairman is Syed Hussain.

6. Center for Islamic Knowledge.

7. MAC Al-Huda School, Ajax, downtown, Mississauga, Mississauga North, Brampton.

8. MAC Al-Furqan School, Scarborough.

9. Free Islamic School.

Calgary

1. Islamic School Omar Bin Al-Khattab.

2. Somali Students of Calgary.

3. Calgary Islamic School.

4. MAC Calgary.

Edmonton

1. Edmonton Islamic Academy.

2. MAC Edmonton.

“Islamic schools won’t have it [Remembrance Day] as a holiday because we don’t celebrate it”

“Islamic schools won’t have it [Remembrance Day] as a holiday because we don’t celebrate it”

Mazin AbdulAdhim, a prominent Muslim scholar and Imam from London, Ont. has stated that “Islamic schools won’t have it [Remembrance Day] as a holiday because we don’t celebrate it.”

He further explained that “it is a day to remember those who died while fighting and killing Muslims… it’s because it is a day to remember those who died while fighting and killing Muslims… The Ottomans were Muslims, and Remembrance Day first started after Britain and France and the others defeated us, killed millions of our people, and then made this celebration starting on the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month, November 11th, to forever remember *their* soldiers who fought to defeat us in that war and then invade our lands. That is why we don’t celebrate Remembrance Day, because we would be remembering their soldiers who killed millions of Muslims.”

Mazin AbdulAdhim’s Facebook post on November 11, 2019:

Today is Remembrance Day, and here is an interesting conversation I had with my daughters about why we don’t celebrate it:

I was talking to my daughters – Safiyyah and Maryam – about whether or not there is school tomorrow because it might be a holiday for Remembrance Day, and I mentioned that Islamic schools won’t have it as a holiday because we don’t celebrate it.

Maryam asked “why not?” I told her that it’s because it is a day to remember those who died while fighting and killing Muslims. She said “but it’s a day to remember everyone who died in wars.”

I said “Ok, do you know who fought in World War 2?” She said “The whole world?” And we all laughed (she knew she was joking). I said “No, it was a war between the Nazis against Britain, France, America, and some others.” I asked her “So, do we remember the fallen from among the Nazis?” She said “No, obviously not.” I said “See, we don’t remember everyone who died in wars. We only remember the those who died from among the British, French, and so on.”

I said, “Ok, now do you know who fought in World War 1?” My older daughter Safiyyah said “Wait, I know this one. It was Britain against the Ottoman Islamic State!” And I almost shed a tear with pride that moment (I don’t remember teaching her that), and told her “You just won $100 Safiyyah!” (of course she didn’t win $100). She said “I learned that in school last year.” I told her she was correct, and then I said “The Ottomans were Muslims, and Remembrance Day first started after Britain and France and the others defeated us, killed millions of our people, and then made this celebration starting on the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month, November 11th, to forever remember *their* soldiers who fought to defeat us in that war and then invade our lands. That is why we don’t celebrate Remembrance Day, because we would be remembering their soldiers who killed millions of Muslims.” She said “ooooh, ok.”

Someone might say “Don’t you think that this is too much to teach a young girl?” And I say: If she is old enough to be taught to remember the dead among the Kafir colonialist West, then she is old enough to remember the dead among the Muslims of the Uthmani Khilafah.

We cannot allow our children to be raised to look fondly on the crimes of the colonialist Capitalist West, or be taught to feel that this is their own history. We have our own history, and we must teach our children to look at the world from our own perspective.

Our children will either be our future, or they will be the future of the liberal secular colonialist West.

May Allah (swt) protect the minds and hearts of our children, and raise them to become the future leaders, teachers, and intellectuals of this Muslim Ummah. Ameen.

Why did NCCM’s Mustafa Farooq remove his anti-LGBTQ comments from Facebook?

Why did NCCM’s Mustafa Farooq remove his anti-LGBTQ comments from Facebook?

On October 31, 2019 I sent a media inquiry to Mustafa Farooq, the Executive Director of the National Council of Canadian Muslims (NCCM), asking why he removed his anti LGBTQ comments immediately after Dr. Rachel Ehrenfeld revealed them in a article on the website American Center for Democracy. Mustafa Farooq has not as of yet responded to my media inquiry.

Media Inquiry

Mustafa Farooq, Executive Director of the National Council of Canadian Muslims (NCCM)

info@nccm.ca

BACKGROUND INFORMATION

Dr. Rachel Ehrenfeld from the American Center for Democracy has reported that Mustafa Farooq, the Executive Director of the National Council of Canadian Muslims (NCCM), removed his anti LGBTQ comments on Facebook.

Ehrenfeld’s report:

On January 26, 2012 Sana Ghani, a former research assistant at University of Alberta, posted on Facebook:

The Muslim and LGBTQ Communities: Is there a possibility for strategic alliances? Al-Hikmah Discussion Group Fri. Feb 3, 6:30pm. Steeps (11116 82 ave).

As-salamu ‘alaykum all,

This month’s Al-Hikmah open discussion is on the Muslim and LGBTQ communities. Both “The Muslim” and “The Homosexual” are lumped into the category of discriminated minority figure/ political scapegoat. Of course, these two figures make very strange bedfellows (no pun intended). What do we make of this situation?

What possibilities are there for alliances, when we might have fundamental disagreements? Why have very different ways of being been flattened into parallel “identities”? How might we get the leaders of our community to address this issue in a more open and nuanced way?

This is a very contentious topic, but we feel there needs to be more open discussion in our community on these kinds of issues. We wish to discuss the kinds of questions, difficulties and possibilities we see here, to get a very important conversation started in our community.

Mustafa Farooq is Executive Director of the National Council of Canadian Muslims (NCCM). A lawyer by profession, Mustafa completed his Juris Doctor at the University of Alberta and Osgoode Hall (York University) and later earned his Master of Laws (LLM) at UC Berkeley in California.

Here are Mustafa Farooq’s comments on Sana Ghani’s Facebook post:

Mustafa Farooq: “We should also have seperate [sic] but related conferences on how Muslims should work with Adulterers, and then another one on how Muslims need to ally themselves with those who take insane amounts of interest, and then another about Muslims with the alcohol industry.”

Sana Ghani: “I didn’t say Muslims SHOULD necessarily ally with the LGBTQ community. The issue is, of course, that the LGBTQ community has been trying to support Muslims because they see a common goal with us (opposing state coercion). I think we definitely need to think more carefully about how to respond to this, what would be best politically for our community, while acting with integrity towards our principles. Dr. Sherman Jackson and Dr. Umar F. Abd-Allah have had really interesting things to say on this issue, which I would like for us to consider. May Allah (t’ala) guide us to whatever is best, amin.”

Mustafa Farooq: “I believe strongly that to ask a question is to create conditions of possibility, especially since in the Muslim community the consensus on this question is, in my opinion, pretty clear. To ask the question is, in fact, to argue that allying ourselves with a certain community is possibly a correct choice. As a political science student, if there is one thing I have learned, we can’t predict the future in terms of alliances. Picking the side of justice, however, and truth, is something we can never lose at (because even if we are oppressed, we are drawing closer to Allah). Dr. Sherman Jackson, I know, has made his opinion on this pretty clear (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HisIwWhyU34) which is to say that we do not condemn homosexuals (just as we do not condemn those who have feelings of attractions towards the opposite sex) but condemn the act of homosexuality (just as we condemn adultery). May Allah guide us to the truth, and forgive us for wen we mispeak.

Hide or report this YOUTUBE.COM Is There A Place For Gay Muslims?

[…]

Mustafa Farooq: “I apologize if my comments came of as sarcastic. That was not my intention. I was merely attempting to make an analogy- if the postulations in my point struck you as conversations you would never have (because they are forbidden) then this would fall in the same category (as it is clearly forbidden). Allah knows my intention, as there are indeed conversations that I don’t think we need to have- it would be like raising objections to having Ayaan Hersi Ali or Irshad Manji [Muslim-born activists critics of Islam] lecture at a masjid [mosque]. Please forgive me if I offended you.”

Sana Ghani: “I take your concerns very seriously, Mustafa. But I’m just not convinced either way, or by this line of thinking. The greatest thing forbidden to us is shirk [polytheism], and yet we make alliances with non-Muslims all the time. We have inter-faith alliances with people who define themselves as a group by their belief in the trinity. Allahu ‘alam [Allah knows best], I just have a lot of questions on this, and I think as a group we could at least clarify our concerns. It doesn’t end here, of course. I want to discuss these issues with scholars as well, as we as a community start articulating and clarifying precisely what our concerns are. This is a relatively new and strange situation we are in, but I am confident that Allah will guide us as a community to whatever is best for us. If this is more harmful than good for us, then may He make that clear to us, amin.”

UPDATE (October 31, 2019) – NCCM Mustafa Farooq’s statements critical of alliances with LGBTQ were removed from Facebook.

QUESTIONS

  • Why did you remove the anti LGBTQ comments immediately after Dr. Rachel Ehrenfeld exposed them in her article?
  • Why do you oppose alliances with LGBTQ communities?
  • Has NCCM under your leadership built alliances with the LGBTQ community, and particularily the Muslim LGBTQ community?
  • Why didn’t NCCM post on its Facebook page the rainbow flag during the Pride month?
  • Why didn’t NCCM issue any statement in support of the LGBTQ community, and particularily the Muslim LGBTQ community, during the Pride month?

I would like a reply by by 4pm November 1, 2019. If you need more time let me know.

Sincerely,

Eric Stanley Brazau,

Investigative journalist

ericbrazau.com